Saltwater Fly Fishing

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Many species of dynamic, athletic game-fish live in saltwater. At this moment, much of that saltwater is over 75-degrees. Salt water fishing in Southern Mexico and Central America can be very good during the winter when air temperatures are near perfect for humans. Both the Atlantic and Pacific sides of this sub-continent provide hundreds of miles of opportunities for fly fishing.
Most of the fish that inhabit water that is less than 30-feet deep or in the top 30-feet of deep water, will eat flies that imitate their prey. Saltwater as a definition for this article equals: oceans, seas, straights, passes, bocas, bays, barras, coves, cuts, kelp, sargasso paddies, mangroves, turtle grass, sandy beaches, pounding breakers, sheer basalt walls & 20-foot swells. All of these diverse habitats contain beautiful strong fish (many times in large numbers). They offer incredible adventure. Saltwater is the frontier of fly fishing, and will remain the frontier for years to come, because there is so much of it on our planet, and most of it is challenging. We often think that all saltwater is deep and that most of its fish are out of reach of fly fishers. Our explorations disclose that in fact many fish inhabit a band of water where sunlight penetration mixes with concentrated nutrients and breeds all kinds of life...fish food...to grow larger fly-eating fish! These fish come in many shapes and sizes that have been honed for thousands of generations to cope with survival in the many and varied habitats. Most are very strong!

Hooking some of these strong saltwater fish can be near life changing. If you are ever fortunate enough to experience the entire hour-long fight of a Black Marlin from a full shut-down boat in the dead silence of 2,000-deep water, you will know why you bought the trip...especially if you get to share that experience with your best fishing buddy. Getting the flies for these amazing fighters is easy, just click here!
Black Marlin with remora attached & Blue Back fly in its mouth. Photo: Troy Bachmann.

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