• Triple coated for extra durability
  • New, more realistic proportions
  • Very realistic looking
  • Easy to tie with

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    Pro Sportfisher Generation 3 Jungle Cock Eyes

    These synthetic jungle cock eyes are hard to tell from the real bird feathers, except they are all perfect and real ones rarely are. These are the third generation of hyper-realistic jungle cock eyes from Pro Sportfisher, and every generation keeps getting more durable, better looking and easier to tie with. This product is so new that we have only began to use them for flies that are being fished. So far there have been no complaints.

    It's all in the eyes
    By Frank Day
    This fourteen pound female winter steelhead from the Sandy River in Oregon ate this beutiful fly tied with Pro Sportfisher G3 Jungle Cock eyes.

    I was sitting at my desk staring at the tube needle in the jaws of my vice with a host of scenarios going through my mind. There was a combination of things I was looking for. In the previous days I'd tailed 3 steelhead, all stuck on darker flies with hints of accent flash flanking the sides. I'd also noticed several large sculpins dead in the tailouts of the runs I had been fishing. For those who do not know steelhead will grab, but often not eat sculpins. It is a response of territorial aggression. They will grab the sculpin in their jaws and masticate it, killing it, and then drop it. The same is also true of out-migrating smolts. Simply put, I was looking for a fly that would create a similar response in a steelhead.

    It was definitely going to be a hair-wing of some kind. Marabou, ostrich, or rhea flies in the round have excellent movement, but not the movement I desired. They would pulse and wiggle like a squid. I didn't want a squid, I wanted a fish. The movement exhibited by a hair-wing fly is a much more lateral forward swimming motion from side to side. There was one fly I thought of. That fly was the Rambulance.

    Bruce Berry is a fly tying wizard and his Rambulance is second to none. The fly was originally tied to mimic the size, shape and movement of a sneaker fish. Sneaker fish are small, sexually mature resident fish. Believe it or not, a 6' resident rainbow is capable of fathering offspring with a 14lb female steelhead. The male steelhead are aware of this, and are highly aggressive in the spring towards smaller fish in their vicinity.

    The fly was going to be a Rambulance in a dark color scheme for first light. My low light go-to color scheme is black and purple. I tied this one on a Pro Sportfisher 40X40 black Flexitube with Pro Sportfisher Marble fox for wings. As I secured the finishing black saddle hackle in place I looked at it and it was a beautiful fly but lacked something. I remembered that Bruce had given me a couple sample sheets of the new Generation 3 Pro Jungle Cock eyes. After giving them a bit of added strength with a coat of Hard as Hull head cement they were ready. Once they were tied in, the fly was perfect. They were everything I desired to fish the following morning.


    This Rambulance type fly was tied for steelhead fishing on the Sandy River in Oregon by Frank Day using Pro Sportfisher G3 Jungle Cock eyes.

    The fly above, tied by Frank Day landed a big, bright steelhead four days before this picture was taken. As you can see, it is none the worse for the wear. The Pro Gen 3 Jungle Cock eyes survived in perfect condition. Tied on a Pro Flexitube this unnamed-prototype fly is part of the constant research and development that goes on at The Fly Fishing Shop year around. It's easy duty, since we live and work in a community that is surrounded by awesome steelhead rivers.

    I truly do believe in the power of eyes. I think they serve as a target point and can be the difference between your fly being some sort of undefined wiggly mass, or a prey item in almost any fish's "fight or flight" response system. Up front, they can help give your fly a more "fishy" appearance. When tied in the rear stage of intruders, they can give either a squid-like, or prawn-like appearance. Mark Bachmann once related a story to me about chasing jack crevalle in saltwater. When they fished to them with similar patterns without a defined eyeball, they stopped catching fish. I can't argue with that. A jack may not be a steelhead, but they are both ocean going predators and respond to target points on a prey item similarly.

    The following day, I woke up at 3 a.m., made my coffee and breakfast, and left my snow covered home at 5000 ft for the wet rainforest and light drizzle in the valley below. As I sat in the dark waiting for the opposite bank to gain definition, I tied on the fly constructed the night before. There was a light rain falling, pattering against the hood of my G4 jacket and dripping off the brim of my hat; perfectly fishy weather. I had the perfect fishy fly, the perfect weather, and a run that I knew was holding a fish somewhere.

    The far shore slowly started gaining some definition. There was no sunrise. This was not the Deschutes with summer fish and a spectacular pastel sunrise against canyon walls. This was winter steelheading in the temperate rainforest. There were no vibrant, fiery hues to paint the sky, only a slow departure of blackness into the gray mist of early morning.

    As I stepped out and flopped my first few tip casts, I heard a large splash just over my shoulder in the main channel. It was a sound I'd heard and seen many times before. The porpoise of a traveling anadromous fish, in this case undoubtedly a winter steelhead. I paid it no mind as that fish was likely now out of reach and traveling upstream to meet his or her mate, or perhaps some lucky angler. I continued my dance of single spey, mend, swing, step down the dance hall of the run I was in. Everything was perfect. No noise. No thought other than what my fly was doing. The subtle whisper of the water telling me, "They're here."

    As I neared the tailout and an area I knew to be "the bucket", I started feeling that anticipation, that feeling in your gut that usually ends in smiles and high fives. All of my senses were on edge as I felt my swing swimming my fly through the currents. My swing was delivering my fly at the perfect speed I desired. Often times, when your fly is doing what it should presenting itself appropriately, you can feel a strike before your swing even comes tight. And then it came. A third of the way through my swing, something touched my fly. I was instantly on red alert with all of my senses heightened and my predatory instincts at a maximum. I felt a quick, yet gentle and determined pull, then fish weight. I released my slip-loop allowing the fish to fully take my fly and then set the hook by moving my rod toward the bank.

    My rod doubled over and the surface bulged and boiled with the confusion of a large fish. A tail broke the surface as the fish thrashed, attempting to determine exactly what was going on and how it had gone from predator to prey in the quickest, strangest manner it had ever experienced. Once oriented, my fish bolted directly for the tailout. My Hardy Bougle made some very pleasurable sounds that will put any swung fly fisher on edge. My fingertips pressed hard into the porting of the spool providing the friction from keeping my prize from dropping back to the Columbia. A mere 15 ft from the tailout, the fish finally stopped and I began gaining ground.

    With tip low and my line bellied to the inside, the fish now had pressure from the rear forcing her to travel up to me. As she came parallel in the current to me, I could indeed see that she was in fact a she, and that she was also very large and bright. Her fins were that translucent whitish-blue that is sometimes an excellent visual for spotting fish. She saw my form and instantly broke back for the main channel. We proceeded to play a tug of war for the following 10 minutes, with each run and move she made growing shorter and less spirited, and each move I made giving me more and more confidence that we would meet for a handshake.

    She finally succumbed to my tackle and allowed me to sweep her alongside me to be tailed. As I cradled her in the calm soft water near the shore I could barely see my fly. The entire fly was in her mouth. My mono loop rigged size 4 Gamakatsu octopus hook was buried deeply in the center of her tongue. I was astounded at how fully she had decided to grab my fly. As the fly lay there against her jaw swishing back and forth in the current, there was one thing on it that stood out. The jungle cock eyes. In that moment I thought to myself, "Man, it really is all in the eye."

    Mark Says:

    Classic flies for anadromous fish have been graced with Jungle Cock eyes since the rise of the British Empire, to the point where the Gray India Jungle Fowl was put on the international Endangered Species list. After a while, domestic Jungle Fowl were raised for fly tying feathers. They proved to be difficult to propagate and once again Jungle cock eyes became very rare at the tying bench. Yet the demand persisted because of fly tying tradition and a perception that flies with Jungle Cock eyes catch more fish. I started a skeptic, but became an advocate as evidence mounted that these eyed feathers did in fact make a difference.

    Claccis steelhead bucktail flies like this Green Butt Skunk tied by Mark Bachmann for the Deschutes River in Oregon are enhanced with Pro Sportfisher G3 Jungle Cock. The steelhead in the picture weighs about fifteen pounds.

    Many fake Jungle Cock eyes have been produced over the years. All have succumbed to the garbage can of time. Some were too thick, others too stiff, and others were just too fragile. Now it seems that Pro Sporfisher has finally cracked the code. The G3 eyes are believable to look at, easy to tie with and possibly more durable than the real thing. And maybe the few remaining wild Gray India Jungle fowl can sleep a little more securely.

    This fly was tied using Po Sportfisher Generation 3 Jungle Cock eyes by Tony Barnes for fishing the Sandy River in Oregon
    The fly above was tied by Tony Barnes, who has been inventing flies and catching steelhead for about forty years. Tony and his flies are both unconventional and deadly.