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Adams Adams, dry fly, trout fishing
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: 31-0010- -

Originally tied by Lenard Halladay of Mayfield, Michigan in about 1922, for fishing the Boardman River. The Adams has remained one of the most popular dry flies in the country. In the Pacific Northwest it is a very effective searching pattern in sizes 12-16 for most freestone streams. The Adams can be an incredibly productive fly for evening fishing on Oregon's Deschutes. Sizes 14-18 are most popular. Fish your Adams upstream in the conventional manner. Let it float down stream below you then...

Brooks Sprout Callibaetis Brooks Sprout Callibaetis
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: BB050 -

Simulates an emerging Callibaetis mayfly hanging through surface film, while sliding from the nymphal shuck. Dress the parachute style hackle but leave the body and shuck undressed.

Callibaetis Comparadun Callibaetis Comparadun
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: DRY290 -

Comparaduns are flush floating dry flies that have became extremely popular with anglers fishing mayfly hatches. The Callibaetis pattern is extremely important during peak hatch periods.

Callibaetis Emerger Nymph, picture
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: E020 -

Many Callibaetis mayflies emerge from the nymphal shuck while still under water. Both the Callibaetis Emerger Nymph and the Timberline Emerger simulate this subsurface emergence. Both flies are fished wet, are allowed to sink and then retrieved back toward the surface of the water with twitchy retrieve.

Callibaetis Sparkle Dun, picture
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: DRY810 -

Callibaetis Sparkle Dun This is one of the most popular dry flies for fishing a Callibaetis hatch on lakes. it simulates a dun with a trailing shuck. The Sparkle Dun series of dry flies was invented by Craig Mathews of West Yellow Stone, Montana. If this type of fly has a fault, it is that it can quickly become waterlogged with fish slime, and is less effective until it is dried and retreated with floatant. Better have several in your fly box. ...

Harrops Captive Dun Callibaitis, picture
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: RD115D -

This is a very productive fly, but somewhat fragile. You will want to have a good supply of them. Captive Dun flies can often turn the tables on fish that have seen a lot of pressure and have become wise to other patterns.

Harrops D&D Cripple Callibaetis, Picture
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: RD115CD -

Some Callibaetis mayfly hatches result in many flies not having enough energy to make out of the nymphal shuck, thus being trapped unto death. They become easy meals for lazy trout who learn to capitalize on that situation. Dress the hackle and wing. Wet the body and tail so that they dangle through the surface.

Hi-Vis Parachute Adams, Picture
Price: $2.25
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Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: DRY470 -

This pattern incorporates a fluorescent red and chartreuse Antron wing post. This color is easier to see than white when fishing where there are a lot of foam patches on the water.

Mayfly Nymph, Callibaetis Mayfly Nymph, Callibaetis
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: RN115 -

Mayfly Nymph, Callibaetis Callibaetis nymphs are swimmers, and imitations are usually fished with a slow twitch retreive.

Callibaetis Organza Spinner fly, picture
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: BB270 -

Callibaetis are the most numerous mayflies in many of the Western Hemisphere's lakes, ponds and slow moving streams. In rich alkaline lakes, these insects can hatch in such numbers to mimic clouds of smoke. Trout, bass and panfish all eat Callibaetis Mayflies in the nymph, dun and spinner stages. The Organza Wing Callibaetis Spinner is the most popular pattern for the spinner fall of these insects.  Callibaetis spinners can lay their egs and fall dead during the latter stages of a hatch...

Parachute Adams  Parachute Adams Traditional, dry fly, trout fishing,
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: 14-0080 -

This is one of the most popular dry flies in the Pacific Northwest. It is used to imitate a wide variety of mayfly and caddis species. It is often the best searching pattern when no surface activity apparent. The wing is made from white calf body hair.

Pheasant Tail Nymph Pheasant Tail Nymph
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: 1454 -

This is the most popular pattern for simulating both Callibaetis and PMD Mayfly Nymphs. This unweighted fly can be fished just below the surface, or at any depth by using a sinking line or adding weight to the leader.

Timberline Emerger Timberline Emerger
Price: $2.25
Availability: In Stock 1-2 day
Item #: E145 -

Many Callibaetis mayflies emerge from the nymphal shuck while still under water. Both the Callibaetis Emerger Nymph and the Timberline Emerger simulate this subsurface emergence. Both flies are fished wet, are allowed to sink and then retrieved back toward the surface of the water with twitchy retrieve.

Callibaetis Mayflies

Callibaetis Mayflies are delicate, beautiful creatures that inhabit many different kinds of lakes. They are very important to fly fishers because they are prolific and available to trout as food nearly year round. Callibaetis mayflies belong to the Baetidae family of mayflies. Most Baetidae are multi brooded. Baetidae nymphs mature exceedingly fast and several generations can emerge within a single season. Hatches can start in early April on low elevation lakes and continue through October at high elevations. Normal hatch time is a two hour period mid to late morning. Cold days can produce hatches as late as mid-afternoon. The largest Callibaetis hatch early in the season and the smallest in the fall.

Baetidae nymphs are strong swimmers. They are also very active, flitting from place to place much of the time. This activity makes them available to trout and easy to mimic with flies. Colors of nymphs tend to shift with the color of the lake bottom, however most are brown tones. A slim dressed Pheasant Tail Nymph is the most widely used pattern. It can be very productive when fished near the bottom and retrieved with short, sharp strips.

During the spring months, gasses form between the skin of the nymph and the body of the forming adult insect inside. The wing pads and back of the nymph often turn shiny with internal gas bubbles. These bubbles gradually build and will eventually make the nymph so buoyant that it is carried to the surface where it will hatch into a dun. For a period of time, the buoyant nymphs will try to swim back to the bottom to hide in the vegetation. This up and down activity can attract a lot of attention from patrolling trout. Try fishing a Flashback Pheasant Tail with a floating line, long leader prior to the suspected hatch. A strike indicator and a slow strip and pause retrieve can do the trick.

When Callibaetis hatch, the nymph rises to the surface where it bumps into the meniscus. Here it hangs with only the hump of the thorax breaking though the surface. Normally, within seconds the thorax splits and the adult emerges. Cold or cloud cover days will slow the hatching process and usually provide the best fishing. Often during the start of the hatch, the trout target floating nymphs and emerging duns. At this stage loop wing emergers or sparkle duns can provide great success. After the dun slips out of the nymph, it rides on the surface of the water until the wings are dry enough to carry it aloft. During later stages of the hatch, most of the mayflies that are available to the feeding trout are fully hatched. Our favorite dry fly is the Callibaetis Loop Wing Parachute.

After leaving the water, the duns fly to the shore-side vegetation where they molt and turn into the reproductive adults or spinners. Be sure to have several Callibaetis Spinner patterns in your fly collection.